Courchevel Ski Resort

If you’re looking for luxury and access to the vast network of pistes that make up the Three Valleys, Courchevel is the ideal base for your next ski holiday.

Although the resort has a reputation as a playground for the rich and famous, the skiing really is first class. The local area has a good mix of tree-lined slopes below the resort and wide, open runs above it – more than enough to keep most happy for days. However, add in access to the rest of the Three Valleys and the resorts of Méribel and Val Thorens – via the Saulire and the Col de la Loze – and the options are seemingly limitless, especially for keen piste skiers.

The resort is home to perhaps the widest selection of 5* hotels of any ski resort in the world and with this comes luxury shops, swanky bars and top-class restaurants. Nowhere more so is this the case than Courchevel 1850. The other villages are generally better value and have a much greater range of accommodation, bars and restaurants.

With 600km of pistes to explore across the Three Valleys, getting around can seem slightly daunting. Therefore, why not sign up to the Ski Club’s Instructor-led Guiding Service – running in the resort between 22nd December and 13th April this season.

Another place to gain some great information is the Ski Club’s Courchevel Facebook Page, where the group’s members will be more than happy to help if you have any questions.

Our Courchevel Resort Ratings

  • Beginner ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Intermediate ★ ★ ★ ★ ★
  • Advanced ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
  • Snow Reliability ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Fast Lifts ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Resort Activities ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
  • Après ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
  • Value ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
Pros

Great range of local slopes

Good snow record, lots of snowmaking and an impressive lift system

Wooded slopes below the resort are excellent in bad weather

Lots of varied accommodation – you don't have to stay in the luxury of 1850

Cons

Very expensive in 1850, but better value can be found elsewhere

Some slopes can get crowded

Downloading may be required to lower villages in poor snow years

Unless there has been fresh snow there are better places for advanced/expert skiers

Courchevel Skiing and Snowboarding

Courchevel has the benefit of having a good array of tree-lined slopes when compared to the other parts of the Three Valleys, making it a great place to be during a snowstorm. Above the village, most of the runs are rated blue, however steeper terrain can be found up by the Saulire – including the famous Grand Couloir – and there are good beginner slopes in each of the resort villages.

  • Total Pistes: 150 km (600km in Three Valleys)
  • Green: 23%
  • Blue: 35%
  • Red: 32%
  • Black: 10%
  • Lifts: 52 (186 in Three Valleys)
  • Altitude: 1100m – 2740m (Three Valleys extends to 3230m)

For Beginners

There are excellent nursery slopes above both Courchevel 1650 and 1850 and at least one free lift in each of the resort villages. At 1650, there are short drags right above the village, whilst at 1850 there are two great areas, one at Pralong and the other at the Jardin Alpin. Beyond this, progression is excellent to the longer greens at 1650 and the gentle blues at Biollay.

For Intermediates

With so much terrain to choose from, deciding where to go can prove to be the biggest challenge. Many of Courchevel’s local slopes are ideal for practicing your turns, just watch out for some crowded intersections at weekends or during the main holiday weeks. Strong intermediates should definitely attempt to ski all of the resorts in the Three Valleys – with the easiest access from Courchevel coming via the Col de la Loze.

For Advanced/Expert & Off Piste

Although there are few blacks marked on the piste map, there are some great challenges – most noticeably the Grand Couloir from the top of the Saulire. Make sure you check out the daily grooming maps to see if any of the blacks have been groomed – especially Suisse and M – as these will be a blast with fresh corduroy. If there is fresh snow, the local options are great, but be sure to head across to Mont Vallon above Méribel for 800m of off piste vertical.

Courchevel Piste Map

The piste map can be downloaded here. An impressive 3D interactive piste map of the Three Valleys is also available.

Courchevel Ski Pass Prices

Beginners and most intermediates will be more than happy with a Courchevel only ski pass, but more advanced skiers should definitely purchase the Three Valleys pass. A season pass for Courchevel costs €1110, whilst you can ski the Three Valleys all winter for €1310. Note that prices vary throughout the season and that they may change, so check with the resort’s website for the latest or give the Ski Club’s expert info & advice team a call on 020 8410 2009.

Category

Day Ticket

3 Days

6 Days

Courchevel Only

Adult (13-65)

€38.20 – €62

€113.40 – €162

€190.40 – €306

Child (5-13)

€30.50 – €49.60

€90.70 – €146.40

€152.30 – €244.80

Senior (65+)

€34.30 – €49.50

€102 – €148.80

€171.30 – €246

Three Valleys

Adult (13-65)

€49.60 – €62

€146.40 – €183

€244.80 – €306

Child (5-13)

€39.60 – €49.60

€117.10 – €146.40

€195.80 – €244.80

Senior (65+)

€44.60 – €55.80

€131.70 – €164.70

€195.80 – €275.40

Courchevel Season Dates

  • Opening Date: 7th December 2019
  • Closing Date: 26th April 2020

For full details see the resort's website and note that these dates are subject to change. The Ski Club’s expert info & advice team are also on hand to help – call 020 8410 2009.

Courchevel Resort

Courchevel 1850 has most of the smart hotels, luxury shops and restaurants – just don’t expect any of them to be cheap. It has several distinct sectors but most of the accommodation is ski-in-ski-out. The other resort villages are cheaper and more simple. 1650 is probably best for families and beginner skiers as the hill above it is ideal for those just starting out, whilst skiers wanting quick access to the rest of the Three Valleys should consider La Tania at the foot of the Col de la Loze.

For Families

Courchevel is a great choice for families as there is lots of convenient accommodation, all of which is within easy reach of gentle slopes. Many of the fast chairlifts have an electro-magnet system that works with special bibs to hold children securely onto the chairlifts. In town there are numerous agencies offering babysitting and at 1650 in particular, there is lots to keep little ones entertained – including an excellent toboggan trail.

For Après

Compared to the other resorts in the Three Valleys, Courchevel is the least lively of the resorts, but there are still some good bars to visit after a day on the slopes. 1850 is expensive and expect to see groups of well-heeled guests sipping champagne instead of cold beers. Perhaps your best bet are the bars in 1650, where Boulette in particular can develop into a lively après venue.

How to get to Courchevel

Chambéry is the closest airport to Courchevel and private transfers are the best option – the drive takes around an hour and a half. Geneva is further away, with the drive taking around two and a half hours.

A great option is to travel by train, catching the Eurostar to the town of Moûtiers in the valley before grabbing a quick bus transfer up to the resort. See the Ski Club's in-depth guide to getting out to the Alps by train – follow this link.

  • Chambéry airport: 1.5 hours (driving)
  • Geneva airport: 2.5 hours (driving)
  • Snowtrain: 8-10 hours from London
  • Calais: approximately 11 hours driving (598 miles)

Courchevel Contact Details

Holiday Discounts

Resort Discounts

Good For

Ability
  • Advanced
  • Beginner
  • Intermediate
In Resort
  • Family Friendly
  • Off The Slopes
  • Ski To Door
On Slope
  • Boarder
  • Fast Lifts
  • No Queues
  • Snow Reliability

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