Alta Badia Ski Resort

Alta Badia lies in the stunning Dolomites and is part of the mighty Sella Ronda ski circuit. It is actually a collection of six villages, each are different but all are home to exceptional food.

All of the villages that make up Alta Badia (except La Val) are directly linked to the Sella Ronda circuit, one of the Alps’ best intermediate playgrounds. Corvara and Colfosco are best placed to access the vast network of slopes, but with this comes bigger crowds – base yourself down in Badia for quiet local slopes and a relaxed holiday. Challenges for advanced and expert skiers and boarders are few and far between in this region, but the tough run back down to the valley – host each winter to one of the toughest Giant Slalom races on the World Cup calendar – more than deserves its black status.

Although each village is different, most have an old core and have been tastefully expanded – there are no large blocks here. The scenery is spectacular throughout and the food here is arguably some of the best in any ski region worldwide – the Alta Badia valley has no fewer than six Michelin Stars, more than some of the largest world cities combined.

Our Alta Badia Resort Ratings

  • Beginner ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Intermediate ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Advanced ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
  • Snow Reliability ★ ★ ★ ☆ ☆
  • Fast Lifts ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Resort Activities ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
  • Après ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆
  • Value ★ ★ ★ ★ ☆
Pros

Access to some of the world’s best intermediate terrain around the Sella Ronda Massif

Reliable snow thanks to extensive snowmaking

Incredible food both on the slopes and also in the resort towns

Cons

Badia is just off the main circuit so getting there requires a few lift rides

Few challenges for advanced skiers and riders

Lots of the runs are short, with limited vertical

Alta Badia Skiing and Snowboarding

Each of the main villages are home to some decent low-level beginner zones, but the real highlight is the vast selection of gentle blues located above Corvara. On the whole the vertical may not be huge but there are so many runs to explore and if you ski all the way back down to the valley (look out in particular for piste 9A above San Cassiano) you’ll clock up more mileage.

Adventurous intermediates and up should make the most of the Sella Ronda ski area and take on the famous route via Val Gardena, Arabba and Canazei. Unfortunately, the abrupt geology of the Dolomites limits the available off piste, whilst on piste challenges are limited – but there are numerous terrain parks and Alta Badia’s World Cup run (piste 17) is tough.

  • Total Pistes: 130km (1000km in Dolomiti Superski)
  • Blue: 54%
  • Red: 40%
  • Black: 6%
  • Lifts: 53 (452 lifts in Dolomiti Superski)
  • Altitude: 1324m – 2550m

Alta Badia Piste Map

The local area map can be downloaded here.

Alta Badia Resort

Each of the six villages offers something different, but for maximum convenience and best access into the ski area we’d recommend either Corvara or La Villa. The latter is somewhat smaller and quieter, but there is a decent choice of accommodation and prices are very reasonable. Corvara is bigger and busier, so come here if you’re looking for a more lively après ski scene.

As mentioned, food is a major attraction away from the slopes – indeed many people visiting Alta Badia won’t even click into a pair of skis. The St. Hubertus hotel in San Cassiano is one of only ten 3* restaurants in Italy – spend the money you save on a holiday by coming here on a meal at one of the world’s best restaurants.

How to get to Alta Badia

There are two main airport options, Venice and Verona, both of which are between two and three hours drive away from the resort.

  • Venice airport: 2.5 hour (driving)
  • Verona airport: 2.5 hours (driving)

Alta Badia Contact Details

Good For

In Resort
  • Ski To Door

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